Best Cooling Mattress
- Apr 11, 2018 -

For many sleepers, sleeping warm is a nightly frustration that is a perpetual detriment to restful and comfortable sleep. Your weight, home, climate, age, and personal preference can all impact how hot you sleep. These factors play into the bed you’re sleeping on as well. The combination of your mattress, mattress protector, sheets, and bed foundation are all involved in how cool or warm your sleep experience is.

For this guide we’re going to focus on the best mattress for hot sleepers. These are sleepers who I would describe as above average in terms of their cooling needs. The reason why you sleep hot isn’t as important, all that really matters is you sleep warm and you need the right combination of mattress and other bedding accessories to help better manage the temperature regulation of your bed.

The materials used in the mattress are an important factor in determining whether it sleeps cool, warm, or hot. In any case, there really is just one fundamental factor that determines cooling. How well (or poorly) a material is able to breathe, allowing air in and out of the material.

For example, a traditional spring coil can easily breathe, given that the coils are very thin and at most will be wrapped in a thin layer of foam or fabric, however, there is still lots of air between each coil. A material like memory foam may not breathe as well as a coil, as there is simply more material preventing air from circulating in and out of the mattress.

Similar to breathability, a material’s heat conductivity and heat retention is important. A steel coil isn’t great at absorbing your body heat and it’s even worse at holding onto that heat. However, a traditional memory foam soaks up body heat and retains it, usually causing that memory foam to feel a bit softer and warmer.



While it is important to understand how the material a mattress is made from can impact cooling and heat performance it’s more critical to understand how these materials work together within the larger design of the mattress itself. For example, you will almost never see a mattress that is 100% traditional visco elastic memory foam from top to bottom. Instead, you’ll have a layer or two of memory foam and a layer or two of poly foam. These materials work together to create airflow and a comfortable cooling surface on the mattress.

Below are some of the designs for the most popular mattresses and how these designs facilitate cooling:

 

Leesa – a top layer of Avena foam sits on top of a layer of memory foam and then finally on top of a layer of base poly foam. Avena foam is similar to latex in its cooling properties, which is why it makes more sense to have it closer to the sleeper. Placing the memory foam below Avena helps to prevent any of the heat retention issues of that memory foam